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7

As of 004_Pt24m4xi: Each voting period considers the roll counts at the start of that voting period.1 2 So in your example where you are delegated and you stop delegating, the baker you were delegated to votes on your behalf in that voting period. However, you can vote with your stake in the next period if you are registered as a delegate. To dive a little ...


7

$ ./tezos-client show voting period Current period: "testing_vote" Blocks remaining until end of period: 32678 Current proposal: Pt24m4xiPbLDhVgVfABUjirbmda3yohdN82Sp9FeuAXJ4eV9otd Ballots: { "yay": 2716, "nay": 0, "pass": 0 } Current participation 5.09%, necessary quorum 80.00% Current in favor 2716, needed supermajority 2172 $ ./tezos-client submit ballot ...


7

As a self baker, you can vote via Ledger.


6

You can run all the tests with: dune build @runtest if you want particular tests you need to find their "alias name" dune build @runtest_voting.sh is one of them (That I found with git grep runtest_vot :), the file .gitlab-ci.yml has many examples also).


6

From here: The stake of each delegate is computed at the beginning of each voting period. If a voting period starts at cycle n, your rolls are counted at the very end of cycle n-1 and that value is used for the whole period, that is up to cycle n+8.


5

No. Attempting to do so will result in an "unauthorized_ballot" error in amendment.ml.


5

Period is a 32-bit integer, the current period is 10 so you'd encode this as: 0000000a Proposal is just the hext bytes of the unencoded proposal hash, so you would b58cdecode the proposal hash and convert that to hex. For Pt24m4xiPbLDhVgVfABUjirbmda3yohdN82Sp9FeuAXJ4eV9otd you would do: eztz.utility.buf2hex(eztz.utility.b58cdecode("...


5

Bakechain will include voting, but there is no set timeframe on that. Currently the only method for voting is via the command line tool (tezos-client), but other wallets and tools should add support for this in future too.


5

Currently we're in the proposal period, and you can look up the number of people supporting a given proposal via the following RPC, where you can see the proposal hash and the number of supporters: http://mainnet-node.tzscan.io/chains/main/blocks/head/votes/proposals [ [ "Psd1ynUBhMZAeajwcZJAeq5NrxorM6UCU4GJqxZ7Bx2e9vUWB6z", 614 ], ...


5

Roll count towards voting is independent of roll count towards staking. Look at this baker, for example: they had a large delegation (2 million + XTZ) that caused them to be overdelegated, and the delegator moved to another baker before cycle N + 7 came. But their vote was accounted for with 243 rolls, which will only be in effect for staking purposes in ...


5

There is already a Guide from Obsidian, about Voting with a Ledger Nano SOURCE: https://github.com/tezoscommunity/FAQ/blob/master/Compile_Mainnet.md


5

It was also mentioned by Jacob Arluck in this Medium article. In this post, I describe how the Tezos amendment process works in practice and propose several ways to improve it in the near-term. Deeper questions, like splitting voting rights from consensus, or how amendments should be funded on-chain are outside the scope of this post, but ...


5

It is desired and absolutely possible. We are actively working on it. I think we should be ready to share the specification with the community in 3-4 weeks and then a prototype the month after.


4

There is I believe here a slight confusion on your part in the interpretation of the word "quorum" here because as per implementation there are 2 conditions for the amendment to be accepted: the voting quorum must be met, where quorum here means the percentage of actual votes (yay + nay + pass) to the total number of possible votes (80% initially and ...


4

No, 60% / (60% + 19%) ≈ 76% < 80%


4

One can go in the src/proto_alpha/lib_protocol/test and run dune runtest, which will execute all unit tests for the protocol alpha, including the ones for voting (those in voting.ml). Another test is present in src/bin_client/test/test_voting.sh which tests the client commands related to voting. All these tests are executed when one runs make test.


4

To compute the hash: Read the TEZOS_PROTOCOL JSON file, e.g. src/proto_003_PsddFKi3/lib_protocol/src/TEZOS_PROTOCOL. It's JSON like this: { "hash": "PsddFKi32cMJ2qPjf43Qv5GDWLDPZb3T3bF6fLKiF5HtvHNU7aP", "modules": [ "Misc", "Storage_description", ... For each module name, convert it to lowercase and append ".ml" and ".mli" to find ...


4

Tzscan offers this as an extra information on anyone’s address. See an example here.


4

Only bakers can vote, in order to be a baker you need 1 roll delegated to you (currently 10,000 xtz). Otherwise you can delegate your xtz to any baker that you trust with your vote. If baker A will vote Yay and you disagree then move your delegation to baker B which will vote Nay.


3

The idea is that there must be a significant participation of users to show that the vote is meaningful and that people are ok with the decision. For that, Tezos has a notion of quorum (80% today). If the participation is under the quorum, the vote is rejected (and the quorum is decreased). This way, if you PASS, it means that you looked at the proposal, ...


2

Unless I am reading it wrong, there was one operation injecting both proposals: https://tzscan.io/onydFJLWdGhfKNBfbnSLmqDu93j9NRimkbQm9WqLWYG8eyZUyTF in Block 332624: https://tzscan.io/BMVgMmYjA6zLbdGGKFme1VZ98GBPFgtBoJAigsH6578Yf3b8m5U These are the two proposals: A: https://tzscan.io/Pt24m4xiPbLDhVgVfABUjirbmda3yohdN82Sp9FeuAXJ4eV9otd B: https://...


2

It is a good question. The answer relies on I believe the mistake you made in asserting that there is "no downside" to not participate in the test net. For example: if a baker has rights just after the protocol updates then if the baker did not prepare his setup to adjust for the new protocol he has a risk of missing his first bakes under the new protocol. ...


2

It's the responsibility of those that are proposing the changes to provide the amended source code - we can then validate the changes with the proposal hash. I assume Nomadic Labs will provide this around when they formally propose the changes.


2

No, you can't. But there is another vote during the last round, after the test period. The vote during the exploration period ensures that no malicious code ends up being promoted to the testnet. But the real decision comes after some testing and enough time to understand the real effects of the change.


2

The basic commands and explanations about voting are offered directly on the official documentation page. Basically to summarize during a proposal period you van upvote one or more proposals with tezos-client submit proposals for <delegate> <proposal1> <proposal2> ... And during a voting period the tezos client command to submit your ...


2

./tezos-client submit ballot for "name of your baker" Pt24m4xiPbLDhVgVfABUjirbmda3yohdN82Sp9FeuAXJ4eV9otd < yay|nay >


2

There are really two votes here. Voting on which proposal which actually be voted on. There might be several proposals, but only one proposal can win per proposal period. After a proposal has been selected there are two votes on the winning proposal. The first vote during the exploration period, and the second vote during the promotion period. For more ...


1

It sounds like your baker went inactive when you were switching between Kiln and Bakechain. You can use a block explorer such as tzscan to confirm if you went inactive. Once your rolls are captured in a snapshot you should regain voting rights a few cycles later.


1

Kukai give a list of vote for many delegates with their number of rolls but it offers less guaranty of perenity than Tzscan. https://kukai.app/bakers-list


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